Outside The Lines

Fun readings about Color, Art and Segmation!

Posts

www.segmation.com

October 31, 2013

How is your Halloween Spirit?

As fallen leaves carpet the ground with brilliant shades of brown, yellow, red and orange, a variety of strange and spooky images start to appear creating Halloween Spirit. Ghosts and ghouls hang from trees, carved pumpkins and gnarled broomsticks appear on doorsteps, spiders weave webs across windows and gravestones turn up on front lawns.

Halloween art sets the stage for the scariest and fun holiday of the year.

0
Segmation 5

October 24, 2013

Colors Solve the “Monster Mash” Mystery

The “Monster Mash” caught on in a flash, but is it really a Halloween hit? Nowhere in the song does it mention Halloween buzzwords like “Trick or Treat,” “Ghosts and Goblins,” or “A witch and her broomstick.” All we know about the song is that it was a graveyard smash.

This month, Segmation is on a mission to find out if “Monster Mash” was a Halloween hit or a Frankenstein inspired tune. Was the song released in August 1962 so it could reach the top of the Billboard charts by Halloween, or was it just a coincidence?

0
Synesthesia – Seeing Numbers in Color

October 24, 2013

Synesthesia – Seeing Numbers in Color

It is said that the brain separates creativity and logic. How we view and interpret color operates in one side of the brain and processing numbers exists in the other. But when colors and numbers collide, what is the outcome? Could it be color synesthesia – a condition in the brain that makes a person associate certain numbers with distinct colors?

0
Blue is for Boys and Pink is for Girls

October 23, 2013

Blue is for Boys, Pink is for Girls

Many expecting parents are going with a new trend; they are painting nurseries neutral colors. Are people trying to get away from common childhood stereotypes? Whoever said blue is for boys and pink is for girls?

0
There is more to Color than meets the Eye

October 18, 2013

There is more to Color than meets the Eye

What is better than taking in a beautiful array of color? This can happen in a natural setting, where autumn leaves are turning crisp and ocean waves rush to make whitecaps. It can also occur in an art gallery, where wall hangings mesmerize art enthusiasts, encouraging them to stop and be still.

0

October 16, 2013

Extracting Art from Science

Art is thought to be subjective. But with advancements in technology, driven by adept curiosity, one woman seeks to make art exact. To accomplish this, she extracts art from science.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg is working towards her PhD at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The name of this university correctly suggests the concentration of her degree path: Electronic Arts. In the past she studied Information Arts and Interactive Telecommunications. Now, she puts this knowledge to good use with an original yet familiar concept.

0
What do School Colors and Mascots Represent

October 8, 2013

What do School Colors and Mascots Represent?

People take a lot of pride in their schools. At every age, school colors and mascots unify centers of education. Most schools chose a combination of colors to represent the student body; this offers clear distinction from cross town rivals. To set themselves apart, schools get creative with who or what will represent them.

0
www.segmation.com

October 1, 2013

Katsushika Hokusai – Creative Japanese Artist

Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) was a Japanese artist of the Edo period. He is best known for the woodblock print series, thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji which includes his most recognizable work, The Great Wave off Kanagawa. He was first trained with ukiyo-e, a style of wood block prints and paintings. Later Hokusai explored other styles of art, including European styles he was exposed to through French and Dutch copper engravings. He mastered Surimono, an experimental genre of Japanese woodblock print. At the high of his career, he created the Hokusai Manga a collection of sketches of various subjects including landscapes, flora, and fauna as well as the thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji set, his most defining set. In his later years, he produced One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji which was another significant landscape series.

0